What is Modular or Manufactured Housing?

Real Estate

Modular or Manufactured Housing?

First, some distinctions: Site built and stick built home usually refers to a traditional single-family residence that is built at the same site on which the finished home will stand.

Next, mobile homes are now called “manufactured” homes. The Manufactured Housing Institute defines a manufactured home as "a single-family house constructed entirely in a controlled factory environment, built to the federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards, better known as the HUD Code" with a permanent chassis for transportability. This is the lowest cost stand-alone residence available. You can purchase a brand new single-section manufactured home for less than $29,000.

However, many communities do not allow manufactured homes and insurance is potentially costly.

Like manufactured houses, modular homes are built in a factory and quality inspected every step of the way. Unlike manufactured homes, the pieces (“modules”) of the house are transported to the building site where they are put together by a local building contractor, and they have no chassis or wheels. Also, modulars must conform to building codes in your specific location.

It's important to understand how they  differ, regardless if you are purchasing an existing house or plan to build on land that is subject to restrictions. The differences can affect a home's price and its resale value, and even dictate whether or not it can be built on your land. 

It is important to Investigate the deed restrictions thoroughly before purchasing land for any type of new home. Further, obtain a copy of the Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions, also known as the CC&Rs for your new neighborhood. Study the plat map and know where your easement boundaries lie to make sure you do not place your modular home on top of any easements.